How to write an email to a professor about a final grade

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How to write an email to a professor about a final grade

how to write an email to a professor about a final grade

The old fashioned way works better. When it comes to college students, the belief that more is better may underlie their widely-held view that laptops in the classroom enhance their academic performance.

Laptops do in fact allow students to do more, like engage in online activities and demonstrations, collaborate more easily on papers and projects, access information from the internet, and take more notes.

Online homework and grading tools for instructors and students that reinforce student learning through practice and instant feedback. Tags: ask professor to change your grade, change your grade, grade change, how to approach your professor, how to email your professor, Kent - Tips & Advice, score change Kathryn Monsewicz Her goal is to give readers stories they can see, feel, listen to and love. Turnitin provides instructors with the tools to prevent plagiarism, engage students in the writing process, and provide personalized feedback.

Indeed, because students can type significantly faster than they can writethose who use laptops in the classroom tend to take more notes than those who write out their notes by hand. Moreover, when students take notes using laptops they tend to take notes verbatim, writing down every last word uttered by their professor.

Obviously it is advantageous to draft more complete notes that precisely capture the course content and allow for a verbatim review of the material at a later date. New research by Pam Mueller and Daniel Oppenheimer demonstrates that students who write out their notes on paper actually learn more.

Across three experiments, Mueller and Oppenheimer had students take notes in a classroom setting and then tested students on their memory for factual detail, their conceptual understanding of the material, and their ability to synthesize and generalize the information. Half of the students were instructed to take notes with a laptop, and the other half were instructed to write the notes out by hand.

As in other studies, students who used laptops took more notes. In each study, however, those who wrote out their notes by hand had a stronger conceptual understanding and were more successful in applying and integrating the material than those who used took notes with their laptops.

What drives this paradoxical finding? Mueller and Oppenheimer postulate that taking notes by hand requires different types of cognitive processing than taking notes on a laptop, and these different processes have consequences for learning. Writing by hand is slower and more cumbersome than typing, and students cannot possibly write down every word in a lecture.

Instead, they listen, digest, and summarize so that they can succinctly capture the essence of the information.

By contrast, when typing students can easily produce a written record of the lecture without processing its meaning, as faster typing speeds allow students to transcribe a lecture word for word without devoting much thought to the content. To evaluate this theory, Mueller and Oppenheimer assessed the content of notes taken by hand versus laptop.

Their studies included hundreds of students from Princeton and UCLA, and the lecture topics ranged from bats, bread, and algorithms to faith, respiration, and economics. Content analysis of the notes consistently showed that students who used laptops had more verbatim transcription of the lecture material than those who wrote notes by hand.

Moreover, high verbatim note content was associated with lower retention of the lecture material. It appears that students who use laptops can take notes in a fairly mindless, rote fashion, with little analysis or synthesis by the brain.

This kind of shallow transcription fails to promote a meaningful understanding or application of the information. If the source of the advantage for longhand notes derives from the conceptual processes they evoke, perhaps instructing laptop users to draft summative rather than verbatim notes will boost performance.

Mueller and Oppenheimer explored this idea by warning laptop note takers against the tendency to transcribe information without thinking, and explicitly instructed them to think about the information and type notes in their own words. Despite these instructions, students using laptops showed the same level of verbatim content and were no better in synthesizing material than students who received no such warning.

It is possible these direct instructions to improve the quality of laptop notes failed because it is so easy to rely on less demanding, mindless processes when typing.

In real classroom settings, however, students are often assessed days if not weeks after learning new material. Thus, although laptop users may not encode as much during the lecture and thus may be disadvantaged on immediate assessments, it seems reasonable to expect that the additional information they record will give them an advantage when reviewing material after a long delay.

Mueller and Oppenheimer included a study in which participants were asked to take notes by hand or by laptop, and were told they would be tested on the material in a week. When participants were given an opportunity to study with their notes before the final assessment, once again those who took longhand notes outperformed laptop participants.

These findings hold important implications for students who use their laptops to access lecture outlines and notes that have been posted by professors before class.

Because students can use these posted materials to access lecture content with a mere click, there is no need to organize, synthesize or summarize in their own words.

Indeed, students may take very minimal notes or not take notes at all, and may consequently forego the opportunity to engage in the mental work that supports learning. In the Mueller and Oppenheimer studies, all laptops were disconnected from the internet, thus eliminating any disruption from email, instant messaging, surfing, or other online distractions.

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Technology offers innovative tools that are shaping educational experiences for students, often in positive and dynamic ways. The research by Mueller and Oppenheimer serves as a reminder, however, that even when technology allows us to do more in less time, it does not always foster learning.

Learning involves more than the receipt and the regurgitation of information. If we want students to synthesize material, draw inferences, see new connections, evaluate evidence, and apply concepts in novel situations, we need to encourage the deep, effortful cognitive processes that underlie these abilities.

When it comes to taking notes, students need fewer gigs, more brain power. Are you a scientist who specializes in neuroscience, cognitive science, or psychology?

And have you read a recent peer-reviewed paper that you would like to write about? She explores mechanisms for optimizing cognitive function in college students, older adults, and individuals with intellectual disabilities. She is also the project director for a TPSID grant from the Department of Education, which promotes the inclusion of students with intellectual disabilities in postsecondary education.A student with different learning needs, summer Thank you again for welcoming me into calculus I, and thank your staff for always being there for me.

Having learning differences isn't easy, as this class required full commitment and persistency. The book comes with 70 pages to write on; in addition to that, there are 70 copy sheets.

Attached to the book cover is a flap that aids as a clipboard for each page. Automatic works cited and bibliography formatting for MLA, APA and Chicago/Turabian citation styles. Now supports 7th edition of MLA. Just read the emails between these two.

So, Arnold wrote a lengthy email to the professor, trying to convince her Australia, the country, does indeed exist. If you need professional academic help, contact us. We will quickly write high-quality papers that won’t break your bank.

Online homework and grading tools for instructors and students that reinforce student learning through practice and instant feedback.

How to Email a Professor (with Sample Emails) - wikiHow